Jump to content


* * * * * 2 votes

What book are you currently reading?


  • Please log in to reply
616 replies to this topic

#1 Sweettuth

Sweettuth

    Hi, Im New!

  • Patients
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 06 January 2008 - 09:46 AM

Advertisement:
I wanted to find out everyone is reading? I am currently reading The Omnivore's Dilemma. So far it is a pretty interesting book.

#2 The Urban Spaceman

The Urban Spaceman

    Budtender Deluxe

  • Banned
  • 5,424 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 06 January 2008 - 11:08 AM

Right now I am reading 2 books.  "Clapton: The Autobiography" by Eric Clapton and a book on MMJ Horticulture by Jorge Cervantes.  We can't talk about growing so I dunno if I can mention the title.
Good thread!
Peace & Love
TUS

Posted Image  


#3 Au_Hunter

Au_Hunter

    The best things in life are dirty

  • Patients
  • 2,518 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 06 January 2008 - 11:38 AM

Westering Man, The life of Joseph Walker by Bil Gilbert

Joseph Walker, (1798 -1876) was a frontiersman and while the book is about him, it does also explore the beginnings of westward expansion.

Good reading if you enjoy history.

Unfortunatly, I'm not an avid reader and when medicated, it is much more difficult to remain focused, but it is an easy read and educational. (Research)
“The ideal tyranny is that which is ignorantly self-administered by its victims. The most perfect slaves are, therefore, those which blissfully and unawaredly enslave themselves.”

#4 Guest_Fully Melted_*

Guest_Fully Melted_*
  • Guests

Posted 06 January 2008 - 04:12 PM

I'm reading "Shibimi" and "Crazyladies of Pearl Street" by Trevanian, the guy who wrote "the eiger sanction". I love spy and thriller books.

#5 BabyBoomer

BabyBoomer

    Until there are none, adopt at least one.

  • Patients
  • 4,607 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:50 PM

"eat, pray, love" by Elizabeth Gilbert

Posted Image





.



#6 Guest_shelly420_*

Guest_shelly420_*
  • Guests

Posted 06 January 2008 - 08:24 PM

I have read about 25 of her books!! I love her:angel:
Sylvia Browne...Souls perfection....she changed my life!!!!!!
Hubby took me to one of her lectures last year ..one of the best gifts I ever recieved...LTY:angel:

#7 SubUrban Cowboy

SubUrban Cowboy

    WT Senior Member

  • Collectives
  • 1,697 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 06 January 2008 - 09:11 PM

Sadly nothing.  I just haven't had time, or money for that to pick up a new book.  I did just finish reading some old issues of High Times and Skunk.  Time to find some new reading.
The problem with being a cannasseur is that there are too many strains and never enough time!!:cowboy:

#8 majnougat

majnougat

    toothless dogs gnawing on my legs

  • Patients
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • State:ca

Posted 06 January 2008 - 10:35 PM

i've been reading this intense book on relativity by Kogut.  Its kind of a smallish text book that's a tough read, but its interesting nonetheless.  anyone know the details of relativity?

#9 Guest_Fully Melted_*

Guest_Fully Melted_*
  • Guests

Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:17 AM

majnougat said:

i've been reading this intense book on relativity by Kogut. Its kind of a smallish text book that's a tough read, but its interesting nonetheless. anyone know the details of relativity?


Yes. Your mommy and daddy have sex to make you. Mom and dads brothers and sister are your aunts and uncles. Their kids are your cousins.

Except in Arkansas where the rules of relativity have no meaning. :pop2:

#10 resipsa

resipsa

    Proud Member of Nature's Natural Cooperative Care

  • Collectives
  • 1,337 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 08:35 AM

Just finished Steve Martin's Born Standing Up, which was great. Except for some reason he was working at Disneyland from the age of ten. Didn't know the happiest place on earth hired the littlest people on earth.
I volunteer for Nature's Natural Cooperative Care

#11 Guest_DripDri_*

Guest_DripDri_*
  • Guests

Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:10 AM

I'm about 2/3 through Survivor by Chuck Palahniuk, the author of Fight Club.  It's kinda surreal but presented as realistic - I guess it reminds of Vonnegut, sort of. :confused:

So far, so weird!  I don't really know if I am following it, but I'm enjoying it! :rainbownote: Just call me Biddie!

:cheer2: DD

#12 AnyOtherIllness

AnyOtherIllness

    WT Regular

  • Patients
  • 444 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:24 AM

At the top of the pile is ANSI Common Lisp by Paul Graham.  Lisp is an old computer programming language, as old as FORTRAN (1958), but still in use, mainly with a reputation for artificial intelligence research.  If you are not a computer science geek, you will not love this book as much as I do.  The best book on Lisp however, has not yet been written.
Legal AND Affordable

#13 AnyOtherIllness

AnyOtherIllness

    WT Regular

  • Patients
  • 444 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:30 AM

majnougat said:

i've been reading this intense book on relativity by Kogut.  Its kind of a smallish text book that's a tough read, but its interesting nonetheless.  anyone know the details of relativity?

I know 2 jokes about relativity.

1. Einstein said, a minute sitting on a hot stove seems like an hour.  An hour sitting on a park bench with a pretty girl seems like a minute.  (true story)

2. A philosopher is praying to God and he asks, "God, is it true that to you, a million years seems like a second?"  And God says, "Yes, it is true.  To me a million years is like a second."  And so the philosopher asks, "And God, is it true that to you, a million dollars is like a penny?"  And God says yes, to Him a million dollars is like a penny.  So the philosopher asks, "God, can you give me a million dollars?"  And God says, "Yes I can.  Give me a second..."
Legal AND Affordable

#14 Au_Hunter

Au_Hunter

    The best things in life are dirty

  • Patients
  • 2,518 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:34 AM

harmreduction2001 said:

I know 2 jokes about relativity.

1. Einstein said, a minute sitting on a hot stove seems like an hour.  An hour sitting on a park bench with a pretty girl seems like a minute.  (true story)

2. A philosopher is praying to God and he asks, "God, is it true that to you, a million years seems like a second?"  And God says, "Yes, it is true.  To me a million years is like a second."  And so the philosopher asks, "And God, is it true that to you, a million dollars is like a penny?"  And God says yes, to Him a million dollars is like a penny.  So the philosopher asks, "God, can you give me a million dollars?"  And God says, "Yes I can.  Give me a second..."

Excellent...:hippie:
“The ideal tyranny is that which is ignorantly self-administered by its victims. The most perfect slaves are, therefore, those which blissfully and unawaredly enslave themselves.”

#15 freedom_yes

freedom_yes

    Whatever advice you give, be brief.

  • Patients
  • 57 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 09 January 2008 - 09:45 AM

I am now reading "The Secret History" by Donna Tartt.  I am about halfway through and it is a pretty good book.  I am home sick :sick: this week so I am able to read a little bit more.

:couch2:
"The language and concepts contained herein are guaranteed not to cause eternal torment in the place where the guy with the horns and pointed stick conducts his business."
-- Frank Zappa

#16 majnougat

majnougat

    toothless dogs gnawing on my legs

  • Patients
  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • State:ca

Posted 15 January 2008 - 11:05 AM

harmreduction2001 said:

I know 2 jokes about relativity.

1. Einstein said, a minute sitting on a hot stove seems like an hour.  An hour sitting on a park bench with a pretty girl seems like a minute.  (true story)

2. A philosopher is praying to God and he asks, "God, is it true that to you, a million years seems like a second?"  And God says, "Yes, it is true.  To me a million years is like a second."  And so the philosopher asks, "And God, is it true that to you, a million dollars is like a penny?"  And God says yes, to Him a million dollars is like a penny.  So the philosopher asks, "God, can you give me a million dollars?"  And God says, "Yes I can.  Give me a second..."


haha, how awesome.  loved that second one.  The book i was reading was more of a text book, showing how to mathematically solve relativity problems.  But now that it's over and done with i've decided to read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.  :whoo:

#17 redway420

redway420

    Hi, Im New!

  • Patients
  • PipPipPip
  • 46 posts
  • State:CA
  • Patient:Yes
  • Vendor:Yes
  • Collective or Dispensary:No

Posted 15 January 2008 - 11:52 AM

Should be reading Jose Cervantes on MMJ Horticulture but have mislaid my copy
someplace around here.  These days I mainly scan the net, incessantly and compulsively.

My favorite book is "Millbrook" by Art Kleps. I knew the author and the book's online.

http://palimpsest.st...9/msg00030.html

V/H

#18 weedtracker

weedtracker

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 819 posts
  • State:CA
  • Vendor:No
  • Collective or Dispensary:No

Posted 15 January 2008 - 01:02 PM

i am reading a book.. but usally only when im on a plane, im just too busy at home.. ive been reading it for awhile.. not making much progress, like a chapter or two a year. but its a long book and its not a story its critical essay analysis of the city and its architecture so each chapter is pretty independant of the others. but anyway, its a classic, its jane jacobs 'life and death of great american cities'. its very interesting as the things she talks about as being inovative are things that have lead to many of todays cities problems as well as the cities of when it was written (it was written in 1958 i believe).

#19 redway420

redway420

    Hi, Im New!

  • Patients
  • PipPipPip
  • 46 posts
  • State:CA
  • Patient:Yes
  • Vendor:Yes
  • Collective or Dispensary:No

Posted 15 January 2008 - 05:36 PM

That's the sort of book I would have read at least a few chapters in had I run across it back then in the sixties, and in the past I've been an avid collector
of books from anywhere and everywhere, but due to lack of floorspace I've
donated much to Tiger Lily Books in Redway. More of a newshound these days
and scan the net for new items, the curse of the generalist.

V/H

#20 Guest_Skyline_*

Guest_Skyline_*
  • Guests

Posted 21 January 2008 - 10:06 AM

Currently reading:

"IT"  Stephen King
"Dark Apprentice" Kevin J. Anderson (Star Wars book)
And a huuuuuuge mess of comics :thumb:

#21 MistaUNGA

MistaUNGA

    Aggregating Knowledge

  • Patients
  • 158 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 21 January 2008 - 08:52 PM

Got Last Train to Memphis for Christmas. EXCELLENT biography of the early career of Elvis Presley.

And I'm still working on Tom Wolfe's "The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test"
oooOoOOooo
And if they do not learn [grammar],
they shall be banned to the nether realms
of myspace and facebook...
and the world of psychoactive enthusiasts will show
its face to the world, and that face will speak properly.


:kev:

#22 Guest_Big Pappa_*

Guest_Big Pappa_*
  • Guests

Posted 22 March 2008 - 06:58 AM

Walking on the Wind. About the Cherokee indian's spirituality. Very interesting reading.  bp

#23 The Urban Spaceman

The Urban Spaceman

    Budtender Deluxe

  • Banned
  • 5,424 posts
  • State:CA

Posted 22 March 2008 - 07:41 AM

The Prince by Machiavelli, i'm studying to become a mod!
just kidding guys!
much love
spacey:rapture:

Posted Image  


#24 Historybuff

Historybuff

    Banned

  • Banned
  • 249 posts
  • State:ca

Posted 22 March 2008 - 07:45 AM

I'm currently in the middle of a couple of books.

"Enemy of God" by Bernard Cornwell - This is the second volume of his three volume take on the Arthurian legends.  He is also the author of the long running "Sharpe's" series which was adapted into a television series airing originally on the BBC.  I've read a couple of those, and another trilogy of his focusing on an English Archer during the 100 Years War.  His style is sharp and cohesive, and his characters are both heroic and realistic at the same time.  Cornwell's Arthur is a English warlord, his Merlin is a Druid priest, and his Lancelot is a coward and a prick.  It's all told from the point of view of one of Arthur's best warriors, and the "round table" is treated like a joke.  It's one of the best revisionist takes on the legends that I've read, and yet it still seems familiar.

"Phule's Paradise" by Robert Asprin - I used to really enjoy funny fantasy novels, starting off with Piers Anthony's Xanth series when I was a pre-teenager.  I quickly moved to Asprin's Myth series, which is rife with pop-culture references and good puns.  In my 20's I stopped reading such tripe, but as I age I find that humor is much more important in my reading than I originally thought.  Asprin took several years off from writing due to tax issues, and has only recently begun to revisit his previous series, with very mixed results.  This one is only the second in the "Phule" series, but I have already spotted the tried and true "Asprin" formula, and I'm kind of tired of it already.  

The NEXT Book I'm going to read will be "Small Favor" by Jim Butcher when it arrives in book-stores April 1.  It's the 11th "Dresden Files" book.  After that there's a couple of similar modern day super-natural fantasy series I'd like to get to.

Right now I'm still reading a bunch of fluff, because I can.  Once I get into a teaching credential program I'm sure I'll have to go back to the classics if I want to be able to teach them to secondary school students.

Now I'd like to comment on a few things others have mentioned.

Fully Melted said:

I'm reading "Shibimi" and "Crazyladies of Pearl Street" by Trevanian, the guy who wrote "the eiger sanction". I ove spy and thriller books.

I LOVE Trevanian.  I FINALLY tracked down a copy of "The Eigher Sanction" last year and thoroughly enjoyed it.  I always appreciated the movie, but the book was actually only marginally better.  Trevanian's dry wit is just fantastic.  I've also read "Incident at Twenty-Mile" which I thought was just fantastic as a statement on the death of the Western genre.  Read that book after viewing Unforgiven and you've pretty much got the last word on the 20th Century's view of the Wild-West of the 19th Century.

I also have a great affinity for authors who are more than a bit mysterious or reclusive, ala Pynchon and Salinger.  Prior to his recent death Trevanian could also be viewed in that light, along with the late Jerzy Kosinski.

freedom_yes said:

I am now reading "The Secret History" by Donna Tartt.  I am about halfway through and it is a pretty good book.  I am home sick :sick: this week so I am able to read a little bit more.

:couch2:

Wow, there's a blast from the past, as I read that book when it was first published.  Tartt has a fantastic voice, and is one of the few authors to emerge from the auspices of Bret Easton Ellis and his ilk from the 80's (Ellis was somewhat of a mentor for Tartt).  I know she's got a second book out that I'd like to read at some point, and she's working on her third.

majnougat said:

haha, how awesome.  loved that second one.  The book i was reading was more of a text book, showing how to mathematically solve relativity problems.  But now that it's over and done with i've decided to read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.  :whoo:

That's a fine decision, especially if you've never read any Thompson.  F&L should be required reading for everyone at some point.
Yes, I really am WildWill, as if anyone still cared

#25 norcal_sourD

norcal_sourD

    Judge the deed, not the breed

  • Patients
  • 53 posts
  • State:ca

Posted 02 April 2008 - 07:35 AM

Just finished "Songs of the doomed" by Hunter S. Thompson. That guy was a nut, but a brilliant nut! Very interesting take on the last few decades...
M.Dawgg out!:yinyang:




guest / banned